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20130113
20130121
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)
whole and total package. for years i have said, to have a growing economy and a just social environment, we needed to make as americans, critical investments. you hit three of those critical investments. you talked about research. absolutely critical investment in the future growth of the economy, and to solve today and tomorrow's problems. that's research, most of which, interestingly, is funded directly by the federal government, by the national institutes of health, darpa or one of the other federal agencies or indirectly through the research tax credit that we provide for businesses to engage in research. so research being one of the investments that lead to economic growth. you mentioned the second one, very interesting, and that's education. well-educated work force will be competitive across the world. that is the most critical investment. again, a role for the federal government, certainly a role for states and local governments, but a role for the american society that cannot be ignored. research education. and you drew it very, very correctly, and that is the manufacturing tha
and less risky environments. and how to reward those local governments and governments that actually take large responsibilities for mitigating risk, with their business and investment. >> thank you. we have time for just one more question, although i've got probably three hours of questions in front of me. this next one combines three, four cards, questions from the audience, and comes under the title of damned if you do and damned if you don't. and this is about -- one part was what happened to poor people who can't afford to own land? and craig, you dealt with this, and margareta also. also, some of these vulnerable areas are also economics where factories and infrastructure, corporations are in these areas. and that's part of what drives people to be there. so there's also and industrial and economic aspect to this. in part of the challenge about helping or not helping is an ethical question, as well as a legal question. so i would like each of you to just address that briefly if you could. >> here's how i would frame it. i've been into me places where i call them the proverbial one c
that in a classroom environment with just a discussion. >> that's very important dynamics. >> so game changer, shale gas, regulation, barriers, culture, skill but i will talk about the hormones. dominant, mckinsey issue is sort of the cutting edge of looking at not only global manufacturing trends, but also trains but also trains in which are described as advanced industry. and this interesting interplay of production innovation. how do you see the landscape? >> very much with what you said at the beginning, the context of what transit is a, i think it is a shift going on. i think maybe we should start by saying too many of us, love manufacturing into one big category. there are at least five categories. i won't bore you with our views. i think the tip of it is advanced manufacturing, which is more using the data advanced materials, its nanotechnology. it's the combination of many other things, the innovation, the capabilities that this country is superbly good, the cross-cultural capability and as you said, it only is roughly around 11-12% of gdp, but it's extremely important flywheel. it accounts
, in a safe way, in a way that helps the environment, in a way that helps the economy and the local community and all of the above. but we've been an entitlement -- in entitlement processes around the country that have taken over 20 years. so if you think about projects -- and we're in one right now that i won't name exactly where it is, but it's been over 20 years. we have a project down in tampa, florida, that took us 21 years to open. so it's now the most successful shopping center in that region. it's created at least 3-4,000 permanent jobs. a huge spin-off and a huge catalyst for all kinds of growth. but why should it take us 21 years to do something that's really good? and i think that's the problem. you know, regulation is necessary, but regulation has to have its place. there has to be a balance. and, you know, sort of determining the size of government, a lot of people have said, it should be the people's will, but it doesn't feel that way. and bigger is not always better. and, you know, the idea of a faster and smarter government, you know, i said earlier is really sort of like an o
don't know. you can't ignore the complex interplay between biology and environment when it comes to this illness. >> what about the ethnic factor? we always talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it lack of tolerance? what's the terms? is there a term for it? is there legacy? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and there's an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, preen. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it with the use of experimentation of marijuana, drugs, you're -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana. >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to be -- weigh in here because we already know what the liquor industry and the tobacco industry have done to our country in targeting kids. and so we need to be mindful and not rush into this -- >> like joe camel, that kind of stuff. >> exactly. joe camel. liquor stores are in places where you know that there are people who are going to abuse liquor and
into the international environment, which makes it more complex, but let me use that as a segue. we know and hear about economic impact repeatedly, but who speaks for the environment, and how can we keep that the boys drowned out as a difference for -- voice from being drowned out as a result of a difference of relationships? how do we close the cycle of latency and try to understand where we need information? >> let me start with a comment you made, which i found to be fascinating, that there is between a $11 and $30 for every dollar spent. an ounce of prevention is worth every cure. that is a 16 fold ratio. we know that. our policy has to put that in place. we need a baseline. of course we do. the only thing forcing the baseline is smart companies, and they may as well get a baseline, because they will show we started which dirty water, but there are no resources to get the baseline. we know we need to drill the northeast over the next couple days. -- decades. we need that baseline. we need it desperately, and we needed for human health as well. lots of different communities have different kinds of d
't ignore the interplay between biology and environment. >> what about the fact that we talk about the irish or the native american indians. is it a lack of tolerance? is there a term for it? >> no, no, no. there's a genetic factor and an environmental factor. but the bottom line is we know how to deal with this. prevention, prevention, prevention. nine out of ten addicts started when they were teenagers. if the brain is still developing and you hijack it, you're permanently -- >> you don't like these laws legalizing marijuana? >> no, i don't. i think we need the public health community to weigh in here. so we need to be mindful, and not jump into this. >> like joe camel and that kind of stuff. >> exactly. liquor stores. liquor stores are places where people are going to abuse liquor and have easy access. >> this is too hot. the hottest topic in this country right now is gun safety. your family has been victimized. because of your family being victims, we are all victims. what is your feeling? >> it's not just the person that's killed, like my uncles. it's the whole family. so my father surv
something very different. the individual if you would have taught that in a classroom environment adjust a discussion on -- [inaudible] that's very important dynamic there. >> game changer, shell gas, more regulation, barrier, culture. i want to talk about the here mowns. [laughter] mcken city is about the cutting age looking at not only global manufacturing trends but trends you're describing advanced industry. and innovation. how do you see it? >> i think very much is said at the beginning of the context claus. there's a shift doing on. i think we should start by saying too many of us lump manufacturing in to one big category. i think there are at least five categories. i won't bore with them. i think the tip is the advanced manufacturing which is more using big data. it's advanced material. it's nano technology. it's the combination of many of the things the innovation capabilities that this country is good at the cross functional capability. as you said, it's -- it's roughly around 11 to 12% of gdp. it's extremely important fly wheel. it accounts, football we think, a third of the u.
the japanese planes will be flying again. it is an extremely confusing environment if you have one set of airlines saying they are grounding and another set of airlines saying they are still flying them. >> how disruptive is this for travelers? >> by and large, almost nonexistent. the airlines will swap in some -- jal and ana have canceled some flights, swapped in other aircraft, absolutely minimal. not at the moment an issue of disruption. >> richard quest, thank you. >>> so three months all alone at sea. coming up, we catch up with one of the most determined competitors we have ever met racing around the world all by himself. in a sailboat. ♪ using cloud computing and mobile technology, verizon innovators have developed a projective display for firefighters. allowing them to see through anything. because the world's biggest challenges deserve even bigger solutions. powerful answers. verizon. ya. alright, another one just like that. right in the old bucket. good toss! see that's much better! that was good. you had your shoulder pointed, you kept your eyes on your target. let's do it
Search Results 0 to 12 of about 13 (some duplicates have been removed)